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Prepare your dog for guests

Updated: 9/16/2013 2:42:11 PM
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    Prepare your dog for guests

    Inviting guests to your home when you have a new or energetic dog can prove to be challenging. Just a little training -- for both your dog and your guests -- will make visits more enjoyable for everyone.More >>
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By Stacey Brecher
From The Dog Daily

Inviting guests to your home when you have a new or energetic dog can prove to be challenging. Just a little training -- for both your dog and your guests -- will make visits more enjoyable for everyone, though.

The Jumping Hurdle

A big concern for dog owners is jumping. Dr. Rebecca Jackson, DVM, staff veterinarian at Petplan pet insurance, explains, "The goal is to have your dog remain calmly in a sit-stay or down-stay while the doorbell rings and guests enter," she said. "If he starts jumping or barking, ask your guests to ignore him. Teach them to turn their backs on him, and avoid eye contact, talking to him, petting or pushing him down. Once he realizes that his behavior is not getting him the attention he wants, he will eventually give up."

Believe it or not, even scolding your dog for his improper behavior is still giving him attention, so it's important to stay calm. Practicing this with neighbors or friends can help get your dog used to guests coming to your home.

Once your guests are in your home, if your dog still hasn't calmed, it might be best to put him in another room where he has a bed, water and some toys, so he can calm down safely and avoid injuring anyone.

The Beggar

If you're serving food, your dog might start to beg. "Breaking a bad habit, whether it's jumping or begging, has the same formula: don't ‘feed' the bad behavior … literally," says Dr. Jackson. "Your dog needs to be ignored to learn that fussing and begging will not get him what he wants. Ask your guests to refrain from making eye contact with him or touching your dog while they're eating, and never offer treats from the table."

Not giving your dog food from your table should be the rule all the time, which will help train your dog to behave when guests are eating.

Bribing your dog with treats when he is doing a bad behavior such as jumping is the opposite of training. "Treats, toys, affection [petting] and verbal praise [such as ‘good'] should only ever be used as rewards, when your dog is doing what you want," said Dr. Jackson. "If your dog is jumping and you call him away with a treat, he will quickly learn that jumping equals treats. If your dog is being ignored, and he finally gives up and walks away calmly, then offer praise and a reward."

Check out more information about how to train using treats here.

Overnight Guests

If your guests are staying overnight, try to keep your dog on his normal schedule. Unless his space or routine is disrupted, then it shouldn't be a problem. If you're having kids over, you need to consider whether your pup is normally calm and gentle or easily excitable and jumpy. If you think your dog could possibly not interact well with a child, you may want to keep her in another room. "Even with calm dogs, visiting children should also be instructed on how to behave, including not petting too hard," said Dr. Jackson. "And never, ever leave your dog alone with a child. Even the most even-tempered dog can bite if he's hurt or frightened."

Preparing your dog for visitors is one step in the ongoing process of training that doesn't end with sit and stay. "Training is not only about teaching your dog -- it is about you learning how to teach your dog, and how to instruct others to carry the training through," said Dr. Jackson.

Stacey Brecher is a freelance writer. She has contributed to Animal Fair magazine, and her blogs have previously appeared on The Dog Daily.

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