Rare but contagious disease shows up in the Tri-States - WGEM.com: Quincy News, Weather, Sports, and Radio

Rare but contagious disease shows up in the Tri-States

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courtesy: CDC Public Health Image Library. This 1977 thin sectioned transmission electron micrograph (TEM) depicted the ultrastructural details of the mumps virions that had been grown in a Vero cell culture. courtesy: CDC Public Health Image Library. This 1977 thin sectioned transmission electron micrograph (TEM) depicted the ultrastructural details of the mumps virions that had been grown in a Vero cell culture.
courtesy: CDC Public Health Image Library. The anterior neck of a young child, which displays the characteristic cervical swelling due to enlargement of the submaxillary salivary glands brought on by a mumps infection. courtesy: CDC Public Health Image Library. The anterior neck of a young child, which displays the characteristic cervical swelling due to enlargement of the submaxillary salivary glands brought on by a mumps infection.
SCOTT COUNTY, Ill. (WGEM) -  A contagious, rare disease is popping up across Illinois and there have been reported cases here in the Tri-States.

Four clinically-diagnosed cases of mumps have been reported in Scott County and some of them despite being vaccinated for the disease.

Scott County Health Officials say two 7-year-old children and a 30-year-old and 50-year-old were diagnosed with mumps in recent weeks.

Officials say mumps causes swelling of the salivary glands, along with fever, headaches, muscle aches, tiredness and loss of appetite.

Samantha Kitsmiller got her one-year-old daughter Mia vaccinated with the Measles, Mumps, Rubella vaccine last week, which was the same week she heard about the mumps outbreak in her county.

"I'm so glad that I got my vaccination for my daughter as soon as I heard about it," Kitsmiller said.

Scott County Health Department Director of Nursing Phyllis Jefferson says an outbreak like this is unheard of in a day when most kids are vaccinated.
 
"I think the predominant phase when kids were getting it was in the fifties or sixties and then the vaccine came out and since then we haven't seen many cases of it," Jefferson said.

Jefferson says there are some tell-tale signs that you may have the mumps virus.

"The hallmark symptom to look for would be the swollen salivary glands and if you see that I would recommend taking them to the doctor and have them examine them," Jefferson said.

Jefferson says there is no medicine available to treat mumps and people just need to ride the virus out on bed rest. 

The two children who were diagnosed with mumps have actually been vaccinated proving there is no sure-fire way to not be exposed. 

"No vaccine is 100 percent, especially if they are immune compromised, it may not boost their immunity as well as other kids either," Jefferson said.

Jefferson says if you are experiencing any of the symptoms of mumps you should contact your doctor immediately.

Also, if you haven't been vaccinated for the disease you are advised to do so.

Jefferson says children should be vaccinated at 12-15 months and then receive another shot at four-years-old.
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