Opposition to Adams County jail sales tax referendum puts up sig - WGEM.com: Quincy News, Weather, Sports, and Radio

Opposition to Adams County jail sales tax referendum puts up signs

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Nall says the jail was rennovated in the 1990s, but it's not in the same good condition today. Nall says the jail was rennovated in the 1990s, but it's not in the same good condition today.
Jason Priest and his son Jacob Priest printed and posted these signs around Quincy. Jason Priest and his son Jacob Priest printed and posted these signs around Quincy.
QUINCY, Ill. (WGEM) -

A handful of Adams County officials have been supportive of a referendum to raise the sales tax to pay for a new jail, but the opposition has been quiet until this week.

Black signs have been popping up around Quincy since Monday.

They say "Save money save the jail vote no April 7" challenging the yellow "Vote yes" signs across the city.

When former Adams County Sheriff Robert Nall retired in the late 1990s, he says the county jail was in excellent condition and had just been renovated. He says that's not the case today.

"When I recently saw the pictures of the jail in its existing condition, I was just sick," Nall said.

Nall says he can understand why people in town think something needs to be done.

Current Adams County Sheriff Brent Fischer says a new jail would solve security problems for prisoners and employees. But Nall says a new building won't necessarily be safer.

"If there continues to be incidents, then the management needs to take a look at either a lack of training or a lack of discipline," Nall said.

Jason Priest is responsible for the "vote no" signs in Quincy, and has been spending a few hours a day protesting in the city. He says he's against the proposed county sales tax increase to fund a new jail because he doesn't want to pay more taxes.

"I think the no vote has been tainted with the safety issues," Priest said.

Nall says even if the county builds a new jail, it will need routine maintenance that the current jail seems to be lacking.

"One of the county board members said that he believes that the current administration just let the thing deteriorate for the purpose of getting a new jail," Nall said.

Priest says he printed 50 signs and will continue to try to get his message out in Quincy.

"Even though it's a small tax increase that a lot of people can't afford it right now," Priest said.

Priest says he plans to appear at the city council meeting on Monday.

The referendum will go to vote on April 7.

Below are upcoming forums addressing the referendum:

March 19 - Quincy Salvation Army Ray & Joan Kroc Corps Community Center, Quincy, 7 p.m.

March 22 - Payson Elementary, Payson, 2 p.m.

March 29 - Unity High School, Mendon, 2 p.m.


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