Ballot issue issue addressed in Adams County - WGEM.com: Quincy News, Weather, Sports, and Radio

Ballot issue issue addressed in Adams County

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The letter State's Attorney Jon Barnard sent to the Attorney General and Chair of State Board of Elections. The letter State's Attorney Jon Barnard sent to the Attorney General and Chair of State Board of Elections.
QUINCY, Ill. (WGEM) -

Two state agencies are now looking into the ballot issue in Adams County on Tuesday.

Both the Illinois Attorney General's Office and the State Board of Elections are now involved, looking into complaints that some people never got to vote, after their polling places ran out of ballots.

People lined up for hours hoping to be able to vote Tuesday night. Several people like Nancy Schodroski, never got to.

"As a voter it was very frustrating, and I am frustrated, I'm angry," Schodroski said.

Voter Ronald Summers feels the same exact anger as he was told to put his number down and was promised a phone call when ballots arrived. He says the phone never rang.

"Bad, I don't know how else to explain it, it's just wrong," Summers said.  "I've voted for all these years and now I couldn't vote because of paper, they don't have enough paper."

Hearing from voters like Schodroski and Summers is why Adams County State's Attorney Jon Barnard drafted a letter and sent it to the Attorney General and Chair of the State Board of Elections.

"They have jurisdiction over the election process," Barnard said.  "Where there are problems for instance mechanical problems, logistical problems that could potentially interfere with a person's right to vote.  They are the right mechanism, tools for the job to address the kind of problems I think occurred yesterday."

State statute requires enough ballots be printed to accommodate at least 110 percent of registered voters.  An election board spokesperson says there's no statutory penalty associated with not having the supply required.

Adams County Clerk Chuck Venvertloh says the ballot shortage has raised many concerns and he says the future of voting in Adams County will be different.

"Again, we will do everything we can going forward to do what we can to make it right," Venvertloh said.  "In any election from now on we will definitely have more ballots than we need."

Some people have also asked about a new election, but state board officials say that's unlikely. Residents have called for Venvertloh's resignation.

Venvertloh says he understands the frustrations, but says he has no plans to step down.

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