Illinois Appellate Court puts halt to late voting next week - WGEM.com: Quincy News, Weather, Sports, and Radio

Illinois Appellate Court puts halt to late voting next week

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Ballots for Tuesday's primary. After there weren't enough printed, some voters were turned away the polls. Ballots for Tuesday's primary. After there weren't enough printed, some voters were turned away the polls.
QUINCY, Ill. (WGEM) -

Illinois' Appellate Court shut down late voting next week in Adams County. It would've given those couldn't vote Tuesday because of the ballot shortage a second chance.

"It's crazy, I don't know what to believe anymore," Adams County resident Ronald Summer said. "It's unreal. I don't even know what to say anymore." 

Summers was happy to learn Thursday he was going to vote next week but after the appellate court's ruling Friday afternoon, he won't have that chance.

"I didn't get to vote," Sanders said. "I am an American and I didn't get to vote. It can't be fair."

The Illinois Attorney General's Office pushed to shut down late voting, arguing it's unconstitutional and voting results were already published. 

Early Friday afternoon, it looked as if the voting would happen, after an Adams County judge ruled against the Attorney General's Office. 

But after five o'clock Friday, an appellate court judge issued an "emergency stay," which stopped the late voting.

"I feel bad for those people that didn't get a vote," Adams County clerk Chuck Venvertloh said. "That's my fault and I am sorry for that. We will do what the court tells us to do."

After complaints have poured into his office in the last few days, Illinois State Representative Randy Frese of the 94th District says an inquiry into this ballot issue is now underway to try and prevent a repeat. 

"We want to know, perhaps it was a state legislative initiative that caused the problem," Frese said. "And if we can, can we change that?" 

Venvertloh says looking back, he's learned a valuable lesson. 

"Better preparation," Venvertloh said. "You could talk to a lot of other clerks and learn as much as you want. In the long run, just take a lot more time and be prepared. Just make sure you have enough on hand to make sure everyone can vote when they want to." 

Despite the "emergency stay" ruling, Venvertloh says he will still prepare for the voting as if it's going to happen next week. 

Barnard will argue in front of the appellate court in Springfield next week, in hopes of restoring the late voting plan. 

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