Jury selection expected to begin Tuesday in Lovelace trial - WGEM.com: Quincy News, Weather, Sports, and Radio

Jury selection expected to begin Tuesday in Lovelace trial

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Curtis Lovelace and his wife Christine arrive at the Sangamon County Courthouse in Springfield. Curtis Lovelace and his wife Christine arrive at the Sangamon County Courthouse in Springfield.
Special Prosecutor Ed parkinson (left) arrives at the courthouse Monday morning. Special Prosecutor Ed parkinson (left) arrives at the courthouse Monday morning.
Lovelace's defense attorney Jon Loevy (left) arrives at the courthouse. Lovelace's defense attorney Jon Loevy (left) arrives at the courthouse.
Detective Adam Gibson and Lt. Dina Dreyer, both with the Quincy Police Department, arrive at the courthouse. Detective Adam Gibson and Lt. Dina Dreyer, both with the Quincy Police Department, arrive at the courthouse.
Sangamon County Courthouse Sangamon County Courthouse
SPRINGFIELD, Ill. (WGEM) -

Accused murderer Curtis Lovelace and his attorneys met with the prosecution and judge for several hours Monday ahead of the murder trial.

Lovelace is scheduled to go on trial this week for a second time for the murder of his first wife Cory in 2006. His first trial ended in a hung jury last year.

Lovelace, along with attorneys from both sides, spent several hours in the judge's chambers. There was no word on what was being discussed.

Judge Bob Hardwick said jury selection was still scheduled to begin Tuesday at 9 a.m. He would not comment on the pretrial discussions Monday.

Defense attorney Tara Thompson said around 2:30 p.m. that both sides were done for the day. She declined to comment on the discussions.

The Lovelace family released the following statement to the media at 9:41 a.m. Monday morning:

"There are four key facts that demonstrate Curtis Lovelace’s innocence and the utter failure of the prosecutor to prove guilt beyond a reasonable doubt – and one fact that should scare us all.

1.    Two of Curt and Cory’s sons testified they saw their mother alive on the morning of February 14, 2006.  This directly contradicts the prosecution’s timeline for Cory’s death.
2.    Since this case began, the special prosecutor has offered Curt eight plea deals – reducing jail time in order to persuade him to plead guilty.  Curt has rejected them all – because he is innocent. 
3.    On the day he was arrested, Curt was asked three times if he would take a lie detector test.  Each time, Curt agreed.  The Quincy Police Department never administered the test.
4.    The lead detective in this case went to four different pathologists -- that we know about -- before he could find one who would agree to support his theory behind Cory’s death.

Any one of these facts points to reasonable doubt.  All four together can lead to no other conclusion than “not guilty.” 

There is no evidence because there was no crime.  The special prosecutor’s case is not only incredibly weak – it should never have been brought in the first place.

And the fact that should scare us all?  Curtis Lovelace is a former assistant state’s attorney, school board member, attorney and football star.  He sat in jail for nearly two years because of the outrageously high bail that was asked for and set.  If this can happen to him, what does this mean for the rest of us?

The defense's claim regarding Lovelace's two sons was revealed in testimony during the first trial. The point on the lie detector test was also revealed during the trial while video of Lovelace's questioning was played."

The number of pathologists sought by the lead detective was also revealed in the first trial. It was also revealed during the first trial that police asked Lovelace to take a lie detector.

Adams County State's Attorney Gary Farha said Monday that lie detector tests are not allowed as evidence in Illinois.

The defense's point on Lovelace's sons was also revealed in the first trial.

Lovelace and his current wife Christine arrived Monday at the Sangamon County Courthouse just before 8 a.m. His attorney, Jon Loevy, and special prosecutor Ed Parkinson arrived just after 8 a.m.

Jury selection was scheduled to begin Monday but was pushed back to Tuesday. Judge Bob Hardwick said there would be pretrial discussions between the prosecution and defense.

Hardwick didn't elaborate on what the discussions would entail.

Click here for full coverage of the murder case.

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