Schools monitoring budget impasse amidst graduation season - WGEM.com: Quincy News, Weather, Sports, and Radio

Schools monitoring budget impasse amidst graduation season

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Students practiced their graduation ceremony Friday morning. Students practiced their graduation ceremony Friday morning.
The state budget impasse has impacted many schools. The state budget impasse has impacted many schools.
President Elbe said low income students are impacted the most. President Elbe said low income students are impacted the most.
Mountain said many of her classmates have gone to state schools outside of Illinois. Mountain said many of her classmates have gone to state schools outside of Illinois.
580 students graduated from John Wood on Friday. 580 students graduated from John Wood on Friday.
QUINCY, Ill. (WGEM) -

With many schools holding graduation ceremonies in the Tri-states, you may find yourself heading out to one of them.

580 students became John Wood Community College graduates Friday night.

However, with the budget impasse continuing to affect education in the state of Illinois, graduates like Faith Mountain have taken notice.

"There are quite a few (students) that are going to places like Mizzou because although it's not necessarily cheaper than going to a state school in Illinois, they know that they can rely on the money more in other states than here." Mountain said.

At a time when lawmakers still can't come to an agreement, President Mike Elbe said those impacted the most are low income students.

"Financially for those most needy students it definitely has an impact." Elbe said, "That's why it's so important that our governor and our legislators come to terms on a state budget that supports higher education."

Higher education is something that many graduates said they've come to find even more valuable then they previously thought.

"I've already started looking for jobs, and most of them are looking at some of the things I've already learned at John Wood, these aren't even end goal career jobs, these are just regular jobs." Mountain said.

Since the college has been forced to cut positions, and raise tuition, students like Mountain said they wouldn't be surprised if the trend of students leaving Illinois continues.

"For students in the future, it may impact their decision on whether or not they want to go to a school." Mountain said, "And it may impact their decision on whether they want to go to a four year or a two year because of the cost difference between them."

President Elbe added that the college has a 2018 budget that anticipates some college funding, but they've shifted their focus to the 2019, and 2020 budgets.

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