Illinois ranks towards bottom in business friendliness - WGEM.com: Quincy News, Weather, Sports, and Radio

Illinois ranks towards bottom in business friendliness

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JK Creative Printers & Mailing employs around 30 people full time. JK Creative Printers & Mailing employs around 30 people full time.
Quincy's geographical location makes it easier for businesses to flee to other states. Quincy's geographical location makes it easier for businesses to flee to other states.
Nobis said the study results didn't surprise him. Nobis said the study results didn't surprise him.
Nobis said current conditions in Illinois make it difficult to run a business. Nobis said current conditions in Illinois make it difficult to run a business.
Nobis said increasing the minimum wage would hurt many businesses. Nobis said increasing the minimum wage would hurt many businesses.
QUINCY, Ill. (WGEM) -

A new CNBC study shows it's getting harder and harder to keep businesses and jobs in the state of Illinois.

Out of the 50 states, Illinois ranks 47th for business friendliness.

JK Creative Printers & Mailing in Quincy employs around 30 people full time. However, owner Mike Nobis said on Friday that current conditions in Illinois make it difficult to run a business.

"They're doing little things here and there that end up really being big problems for us, that cause us to have to number one cut back on our staff, cut back on what we end up doing, and it makes it almost impossible to have a business here." Nobis said.

Quincy Strategic Planning Consultant Maggie Strong said the location of Quincy makes it easier for businesses to flee the state.

"It's not easy living in the state of Illinois and being a business." Strong said. "Especially where we are in Quincy because we are on the river, and within minutes of two different states."

Those two different states fared much better in the study, with Iowa being ranked 11th for business friendliness, and Missouri being ranked 23rd. Strong said the lack of a business friendly environment makes it hard to plan.

"It's really about planning for what's next, and you don't know what's next." Strong said. "The pace of change has been so quick over these past ten years, and can you imagine what it's going to be like in the next ten years?"
 
With a push in Illinois to raise the minimum wage, Nobis added that such a move would hurt businesses like his.

"We're going to not have any part timers." Nobis said. "We're already pretty limited to that now. We would really have to even lay off."

For more results of the study, you can click here.

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