Students learn about the eclipse through a science experiment - WGEM.com: Quincy News, Weather, Sports, and Radio

Students learn about the eclipse through a science experiment

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Kids looking up in the sky with their protective glasses. Kids looking up in the sky with their protective glasses.
Kids were awe struck during the eclipse. Kids were awe struck during the eclipse.
Students working on their science experiments Students working on their science experiments
Principal Carr looking at the eclipse. Principal Carr looking at the eclipse.
HANNIBAL, Mo. (WGEM) -

Teachers In the Hannibal School District planned for months to use Monday's solar eclipse as a lesson for students.

Students at Eugene Field Elementary 'oohed' and 'ahhed' after looking up in the sky. A fourth grade student said he was in awe.

"I was feeling...amazed," Josiaha Covey said. 

Teachers brought this experience to life by bringing the lesson outside. 

"This is one of the best days that you can have as a teacher to be able to teach a scientific process and all the steps to that, but also be able to come outside and go through all of that," Michelle Huseman said. 

The district provided glasses to all its students and Josaiah Covey said they worked well.

"It was pretty cool. You were able to see the sun and the moon covering up part of the sun," Covey said. 

4th grade teacher Michelle Huseman says students learned different parts of the eclipse and even kept predictions and observations like it was a real life science experiment.

"What do you think is going to happen," Huseman  said. "That's what set them up for hypothesis that are not correct. In science, not everything works out."

With it being such a big success, Principal Megan Carr said they want to do more hands-on learning. 

"This is just one stepping stone as we teach science through all grade levels, so I really hope they had a lot of enthusiasm and move forward with it and find different ways to make that happen in the classroom," Carr said. 

Students said they couldn't wait to go home and tell their families.

"I think this will be a lifetime event for them and I hope this is something that they will always remember," Huseman said. 

The kindergarten class and other students who didn't feel comfortable looking at the eclipse were able to watch a live feed in the classroom

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