Resident: Veterans' home staff doing what they can on Legionnair - WGEM.com: Quincy News, Weather, Sports, and Radio

Resident: Veterans' home staff doing what they can on Legionnaires

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Water sprays from the fountain at the Illinois Veterans' Home. Water sprays from the fountain at the Illinois Veterans' Home.
Sign marks landmarks around the Illinois Veterans' Home. Sign marks landmarks around the Illinois Veterans' Home.
Outside look at one of the buildings on the Illinois Veterans' Home. campus. Outside look at one of the buildings on the Illinois Veterans' Home. campus.
QUINCY, Ill. (WGEM) -

While Illinois Veterans' Home officials are trying to figure out what may have caused two new cases of Legionnaires' disease at the home, a resident feels the staff is doing all they can to keep residents healthy.

Living on the Illinois Veterans' Home grounds for 10 years, Carol Jardine feels staff are taking the issues of legionella bacteria seriously.

"You can't get any better care," Jardine said. "I can't think of any where I'd rather be. I love this place."

Jardine said nurses test the water twice and check her temperature twice a day to make sure everything is ok.

"They're right on top of it.," Jardine explained.

Administrator Troy Culbertson said testing in the rooms of the two sickened residents came back negative for legionella bacteria. He said the Illinois and Adams County Public Health Departments are looking for the source.

"Our clinical indications or our clinical results are not matching with our water results because we've had such good results with water," Culbertson said.

Local health officials say that source may not be found.

"Unfortunately with legionella most cases never have a defined source," Adams County Health Department Administrator Jerrod Welch said. "There's no source that is found."

Welch said legionella can pop up anywhere, even in spots that previously did not have the bacteria. That makes each investigation start from the beginning. He's also not surprised to find new cases even with the increased monitoring. 

"When people display symptoms they're immediately tested for it," Welch explained.

Staff at the vets home won't sit back and wait either.

"Even a non-productive dry cough, is going to get a thorough workup," Culbertson added.

That makes residents like Jardine feel safe.

"We're well taken care of here," Jardine said. "Very well taken care of."

Staff said they test around 500 different spots for the bacteria each month and that will continue. Administration officials also said they'll continue to monitor residents to make sure no one else comes down with Legionnaires' disease.

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