Sny Levee District asking for repairs, new pumps - WGEM.com: Quincy News, Weather, Sports, and Radio

Sny Levee District asking for repairs, new pumps

Posted:
Pump station 1 outside of Hull, Illinois Pump station 1 outside of Hull, Illinois
Part of the Sny Levee Part of the Sny Levee
The Sny Levee near pump station 1 The Sny Levee near pump station 1
The Mississippi Rive near the Sny Levee The Mississippi Rive near the Sny Levee
One of the pumps inside pump station 1 One of the pumps inside pump station 1
PIKE COUNTY, Ill. (WGEM) -

To protect homes and thousands of acres of farmland from flood damage, officials with the Sny Levee District said they need more pumps. A court hearing is scheduled Friday in Pike County to take up the issue.

The district said pumps near Hull and Pleasant Hill can't keep up with the rising river levels along the levee, stretching 54 miles.

William Lundberg has been farming along the Mississippi River in Pike County nearly his whole life and said the levee protects his livelihood.

"Water standing on freshly planted crops is by far one of the worst things you could have happen because most of the time, if the water stands more than a day or two it will kill the crop," Lundberg said.

The Sny Levee District is proposing a $34-million project that would bring in four pumps, two near Hull and two in Pleasant Hill.

"Our pump stations were not designed to pump efficiently to pump against those high river stages," Sny Levee District Administrator Mike Reed said. "What were looking to do is add these new pump stations with newly designed pumps on them that are designed to pump against these high river stages."

Another part of the plan is to come in and reinforce part of the levee so that seepage water is less likely to come through.

"That water seeps through the levee and is actually going underneath the pump station and during the course of a flood event, we are seeing sink holes develop," Reed added.

Reed said the cost breakdown depends on the land's elevation but could average between $220 to $240 per acre. Reed said the way the pumps are now, residents aren't getting their money's worth.

"We're spending money on diesel fuel and we're not having anything to show for it," Reed said.

Lundberg said investing in the Levee's future is worth the price tag.

"It's going to be expensive, but as far as value of the farm ground, it will definitely increase it," Lundberg said. "There's no doubt about it if they can get rid of the water quicker."

If the project is approved, Reed hopes the Levee reinforcements would be done by the summer and the new pumps would be installed in 2019. If the assessment is shot down, Reed said it's back to the drawing board to find different ways to fix the problem.
 

Powered by Frankly