Quincy Police Department working to get body cameras - WGEM.com: Quincy News, Weather, Sports, and Radio

Quincy Police Department working to get body cameras

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An officer wears a body camera. An officer wears a body camera.
Quincy Police Officers gets out of his car. Quincy Police Officers gets out of his car.
A body camera displayed on a table. A body camera displayed on a table.
Sgt. Chad Scott works on his computer. Sgt. Chad Scott works on his computer.
QUINCY, Ill. (WGEM) -

Quincy's police chief says the dream to put body cameras on every patrol officer is close to reality.

Across the country, it's not usual to hear about shootings and other incidents where police are questioned about how they handled a situation. Quincy police say they're aware of it and need body cameras to protect officers and the public.

"We're at a point now where we really need to get serious on getting this done," Chief Rob Copley said.

Quincy police officers have been testing various body cameras for almost two years now. Copley told police commissioners QPD picked the camera they want. The next step is getting money to buy them.

"Last thing you want to have is an officer-involved shooting or another type of use of deadly force and not have body camera footage," Copley explained.

Sgt. Chad Scott did most of the research on body cameras for the department. He thinks they'll be a big help. 

"It's just another tool for our officers to document things that happen on the street between citizens and them or between suspects and them," Scott said.

The department wants a camera for every patrol officer. Detectives would also check out cameras as needed. Residents think it would be great for the community.

"I think it would be wonderful," Mary Blaesing said. "Why wait until something happens you know? Like I said, anything that's going to protect them."

Illinois law require departments using body cameras to keep all video for 90 days unless it's used in an investigation or a formal complaint against an officer.

"We'll be able to look at what actually happened, what led up to it, why things happened the way they did,' Scott explained. "There's a lot of benefits for the community."

Chief Copley says they would lease the cameras so they could exchange them for new models when the time comes. The department will now work with the city to secure funding but there's no timeline on that or when the cameras will arrive. 

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