Volunteers needed to provide hospice care - WGEM.com: Quincy News, Weather, Sports, and Radio

Volunteers needed to provide hospice care

Posted:
November is National Hospice Month. November is National Hospice Month.
Blessing Hospice says they're in need of volunteers. Blessing Hospice says they're in need of volunteers.
Quincy resident Karen Wiewel received hospice care until she passed away in January 2015. Quincy resident Karen Wiewel received hospice care until she passed away in January 2015.
Jeri Conboy is the director of Blessing Hospice in Quincy. Jeri Conboy is the director of Blessing Hospice in Quincy.
Blessing Hospice provides care throughout West Central Illinois. Blessing Hospice provides care throughout West Central Illinois.
QUINCY, Ill. (WGEM) -

Hospice is something many people don't think about until they need those services, but will hospice volunteers be there when you need them? Officials at Blessing Hospice say they need volunteers. This comes as November is National Hospice Month. 

Karen Wiewel, a Quincy mother of five, fought a six-year battle with cancer and was a patient at Blessing Hospital for a number of weeks until she said she wanted to go home with the help of hospice.

"Karen had over 25 tumors in five years," said Mark Wiewel, Karen's husband. "At that point, cancer was in about 12 different spots in her body, including her bones."

"They would bathe her," said Mark. "They would be there just to cheer her up and talk 'girl talk' together."

Karen was expected to live ten days after returning home. Instead she received hospice care for 104 days. Her husband, Mark, attributes part of that to hospice staff and volunteers. 

"They were just a phone call away," said Mark. "If we had any question at all, you pick up the phone and you call them. In our case, Blessing Hospice were right there for us."

Jeri Conboy is the director of Blessing Hospice and says they are currently caring for 30 hospice patients. The more volunteers they have, the better they can provide quality care.

"Volunteers don't do direct patient care," said Conboy. "They're not going to be bathing patients. They're not going to be administering medications to patients. They're not going to do anything like that. What they do sometimes is even more important than that. They visit with the patients. They spend time there because they want to, not because they have to."

Karen Wiewel passed away January 10, 2015 at home with her family. 

Powered by Frankly