City files response in Lovelace lawsuit case - WGEM.com: Quincy News, Weather, Sports, and Radio

City files response in Lovelace lawsuit case

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Lovelace on the stand during his second trial. Lovelace on the stand during his second trial.
SPRINGFIELD, Ill. (WGEM) -

The City of Quincy filed a new response this week to a federal lawsuit brought on by former prosecutor Curtis Lovelace and his family.

Lovelace was acquitted of first-degree murder in March. He was accused of murdering his first wife, Cory, back in 2006. This year's trial was the second for Lovelace. The first was held last year and ended with a hung jury.

The 11-count lawsuit filed by Lovelace and his family in May names the City of Quincy, Adams County and several individuals.

Those named in the lawsuit include:

  • Adam Gibson (Quincy Police Detective)
  • Robert Copley (Quincy Police Chief)
  • John Summers (Quincy Police Sergeant)
  • Dina Dreyer (Quincy Police Lieutenant)
  • Anjanette Biswell (Quincy Police Detective)
  • City of Quincy
  • Adams County
  • Gary Farha (Adams County State's Attorney)
  • James Keller (Adams County Coroner)
  • Unknown Quincy Police officers

The lawsuit alleges Lovelace was deprived "of his constitutional right to a fair trial by withholding and suppressing exculpatory and impeachment evidence and by fabricating evidence against Plaintiff."

The response by the city, filed Monday in US District Court in Springfield, denies many of the allegations listed in the suit. The documents cite the Illinois Tort Immunity Act in its affirmative defenses.

With respect to Plaintiffs’ federal claims under 42 U.S.C. § 1983, Defendants Adam Gibson, Robert Copley, John Summers, Dina Dreyer, and Anjanette Biswell are entitled to qualified immunity, in that his/her actions did not violate any of the Plaintiffs’ clearly established constitutional rights.

The response by the city comes after a motion was previously filed asking the court to dismiss 10 of the 11 counts. That motion was denied.

The case is scheduled for trial on Oct. 15, 2019.

You can read the full response below.

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