Small business employment growing locally - WGEM.com: Quincy News, Weather, Sports, and Radio

Small business employment growing locally

Posted:
Small businesses have increased hires in the last month. Small businesses have increased hires in the last month.
Shupe said more people shopping locally helps. Shupe said more people shopping locally helps.
Thyme Square moved to this location in 2016. Thyme Square moved to this location in 2016.
Shupe said a national push to shop locally has helped her business. Shupe said a national push to shop locally has helped her business.
Guthrie said many businesses have expanded and opened up recently. Guthrie said many businesses have expanded and opened up recently.
QUINCY, Ill. (WGEM) -

Officials in Quincy say while seasonal hiring may have a slight impact on the increase in job hires in December, they're seeing trends that show small businesses are becoming a force in local employment.

At Thyme Square in Quincy, owner Erica Shupe said on Friday that small businesses like hers have seen recent growth.

"We were, with our expansion, able to create quite a few new jobs." Shupe said. "We went from our old location having about 9 employees to having 26, and all but four of them being full-time."

With new data by the ADP Research Institute showing that small businesses nationwide hired 94,000 people in December, Bruce Guthrie, who serves as the executive director of the district, said he's seen similar trends locally.

"We've seen it in the district and downtown where in this past year along we've had over probably 20 new businesses and expanded businesses," Guthrie said. "So that's adding a lot of employment back into your community."

Shupe also said that in December, she hired two more positions and with more and more people shopping locally, businesses like hers continue to expand.

"A lot of people know how important it is to support small business, and how it supports your community as a whole, and I think the national marketing and advertising towards this has really pushed people to spend their dollars in a local business as opposed to some of the chains." Shupe said.

Guthrie added that with more small businesses, comes more employment and a local tax revenue that stays in cities like Quincy.

"Those people are hiring people." Guthrie said. "Those people are buying products and services in the community. It's generating more sales tax, which is so important for all of these communities, and for this community especially."

Shupe also said that if business continues to go well, she may consider adding even more positions.

You can view more data from the study below:

Powered by Frankly