Illinois drivers asked to make the "Give Them Distance" pledge - WGEM.com: Quincy News, Weather, Sports, and Radio

Illinois drivers asked to make the "Give Them Distance" pledge

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A car with their hazard lights on. A car with their hazard lights on.
A new initiative is underway to challenge Illinois drivers, all to get them to slow down and move over for vehicles stuck on the side of the road. A new initiative is underway to challenge Illinois drivers, all to get them to slow down and move over for vehicles stuck on the side of the road.
Scott's Law was expanded in 2017. Scott's Law was expanded in 2017.
Michael Dade with the Quincy Fire Department says safety should be on top of driver's minds. Michael Dade with the Quincy Fire Department says safety should be on top of driver's minds.
Drivers caught breaking the law can have their drivers' licenses suspended for two years. Drivers caught breaking the law can have their drivers' licenses suspended for two years.
QUINCY, Ill. (WGEM) -

A new initiative is underway to challenge Illinois drivers, all to get them to slow down and move over for vehicles stuck on the side of the road.

Scott's Law, known as the "Move Over" Law, took effect in 2002 requiring Illinois drivers to move over to give emergency personnel and first responders safe room to work on the side of the road. 

The law was expanded in 2017. 

"The "Move Over" Law or "Scott's Law" was amended to include any disabled vehicle, any regular or disabled vehicles," said Quincy Firefighter Michael Dade. "I don't think people realize that that's actually a law now that you're supposed to get over."

That's part of the problem. Dade says he sees drivers all the time not obeying the law. 

"People don't want to be inconvenienced," said Dade. "People aren't paying attention."

Some drivers we spoke to say they never notice drivers disobeying the "Move Over" Law.

"Usually when I see hazards on, I see people move over and obey the law," said Illinois driver Bailey Keller.

"It's just as simple as not hitting somebody and taking a life," said Illinois driver Brett Lenoble.

Others say it's an issue they've dealt with before.

"I've been stuck on the side of the road multiple times and it's very frustrating when people don't get over when you're out trying to change a flat tire, or waiting on that emergency vehicle to get there," said Illinois driver Tyler Lentz. "It's just a safety aspect."

Drivers caught breaking the law can have their drivers' licenses suspended for two years, fines up to $10,000 and in extreme cases, jail time.

"When somebody is stranded, if somebody pulls over if they have a disabled vehicle, generally they're looking for help so the last thing they need is to cause an accident or be hit by somebody who isn't paying attention themselves." said Dade.

State officials are challenging one million Illinois drivers to slow down and make room when they see a vehicle on the side of the road with hazard lights on. It's called the "Give Them Distance" pledge. 

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