Progress towards restoring historic Pittsfield building - WGEM.com: Quincy News, Weather, Sports, and Radio

Progress towards restoring historic Pittsfield building

Posted:
The Zoe Theater in Pittsfield, Illinois The Zoe Theater in Pittsfield, Illinois
Inside the Zoe Theater Inside the Zoe Theater
The lot where the old Mike Tavern's stood The lot where the old Mike Tavern's stood
Admissions prices from the original building Admissions prices from the original building
Pictures on the side of the Zoe Pictures on the side of the Zoe
PITTSFIELD, Ill. (WGEM) -

Work is moving forward to restore the Zoe Theater, a historic building in Downtown Pittsfield. 

The Zoe Theater showed it's last movie in 1986, but since the demolition of the old Mike's Tavern building, which shared a wall with the Zoe, the Zoe Preservation Society has continued the very long process of making it look like new again.

For many in Pittsfield, like Peter Wright, the president of the Zoe Preservation Society, the Zoe Theater has long lasting memories.

"Certainly when I was younger I saw all the Disney movies and maybe Daniel Boone, but the one that sticks in my head is we all came and watched Star Wars," Wright said.

Now the Zoe Preservation Society is making efforts to restore it back to its former glory.

"We want to have things for people to do downtown and bring people downtown to watch a movie, have dinner or something for the kids to do in the winter time," society member Kaye Iftner said. "That's our goal is to actually have it as a working theater."

Now with progress finally being made on the Zoe Theater, other business owners are excited about the possibility of bringing new people downtown.

"I think we even could establish things besides hunting for them to do," Carolyn Casteel, owner of Casteel's Gift Shop said. "I would like to try to get more entertainment for them to do while they are in town."

The preservation society said they can start on reinforcing the structure of the building and restore the front.

"We want to re-vitrolite the front," Casteel said. "These glass panels are called vitrolite. We've located a source for those and we want to start making the front look more original."

In all, society members said the restoration could cost anywhere between $430,000 and $500,000 in hopes to bring priceless memories for generations to come.

"We think that it will bring more people downtown to play, to have more fun and to have family memories like the people who grew up here have of watching movies at the Zoe," Iftner said.

The Zoe Preservation Society plans to hold a community meeting in March to discuss future plans and fund raising, but no date has been set.

Powered by Frankly