Palmyra City Council bans basketball hoops from city streets - WGEM.com: Quincy News, Weather, Sports, and Radio

Palmyra City Council bans basketball hoops from city streets

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Palmyra resident Cindy Klaus has a basketball hoop in her driveway for her grandkids to use. Palmyra resident Cindy Klaus has a basketball hoop in her driveway for her grandkids to use.
You won't be seeing basketball hoops on city streets in Palmyra anymore. You won't be seeing basketball hoops on city streets in Palmyra anymore.
Palmyra city crews don't want kids playing in the street. Palmyra city crews don't want kids playing in the street.
This new ordinance is more in compliance for insurance purposes. This new ordinance is more in compliance for insurance purposes.
A portable basketball hoop in the driveway of a home in Palmyra. A portable basketball hoop in the driveway of a home in Palmyra.
PALMYRA, Mo. (WGEM) -

You won't be seeing basketball hoops on city streets in Palmyra anymore. 

It's a new part of an already existing city code limiting litter, debris, snow and other things from blocking public streets or sidewalks. 

Palmyra resident Cindy Klaus has a basketball hoop in her driveway for her grandkids to use.

"It don't belong in the street, unless it's a tournament or something where you have your street blocked off." said Klaus.

With grandkids in and out of her house, Klaus says safety is always on top of her mind. 

"Times have changed" said Klaus. "Streets are little more dangerous than they used to be."

That mentality is the reason why Palmyra's street department reworded an ordinance, banning basketball hoops from being in the middle of the street. 

"We kind of noticed that it picked up here lately as in around town with the basketball goals moving them out into the street," said Palmyra Street Superintendent Lynn Smith. "We don't want kids out on the street playing."

Smith says this new ordinance is more in compliance for insurance purposes. 

If the city allows basketball hoops in the street they're giving children permission to play in the street. If something were to happen to a child, officials say the city would be liable. 

"There are several people in town with decent driveways and stuff where kids play in backyards on patios," said Smith.

If you don't obey this new ordinance you could be fined $200 for your first offense. It'll cost you $275 for your second offense and subsequent charges after that. 


 

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