New report gives Illinois roads a bad grade - WGEM.com: Quincy News, Weather, Sports, and Radio

New report gives Illinois roads a bad grade

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Illinois roads are ranked low in the report. Illinois roads are ranked low in the report.
Lile said he's noticed some road problems. Lile said he's noticed some road problems.
Lile said Highway 24 has some problems. Lile said Highway 24 has some problems.
Valter said farmers rely on good roads. Valter said farmers rely on good roads.
Some of the roads are in need of maintenance. Some of the roads are in need of maintenance.
QUINCY, Ill. (WGEM) -

A new report gives Illinois roads a D grade. The low mark is because of things like needed maintenance and fuel consumption.

Golden Illinois resident Ron Lile drives roughly 35 miles to and from work each day, and part of his commute takes him along Highway 24.
 
"It's got some deep groves, particularly when it rains you have to watch where you drive, because you can hydroplane fairly easily," Lile said.

A new report from the American Society of Civil Engineers ranks Illinois as the state with the third worst roads in the country, giving the state a D in the category. Drivers like Lile said they're not surprised. 

"Some of our roads need some attention, some maintenance." Lile said. "We get on the interstate, and the interstates are pretty good, but we do have some pretty good pot holes that are showing up."

While drivers expressed their frustrations with the roads, Adams County Farm Bureau Manager Shawn Valter said transportation conditions are crucial for farmers.

"Farmers, you know they grow their crop, and then they have to transport from their fields, to their bins, then to the local elevators, and then the local elevator has to get a truck to their final destination," Valter said.

The report also suggested one way the state can improve its grade is to evaluate the long term impact of motor fuel taxes, but Valter said there no single fix to this issue.  

"If they have to raise the tax on gas, that's going to get in everybody's pockets including the farmers, and so there's no easy solution." Valter said.

The report also suggested increasing funding for advanced highway research, and increasing the use of federal dollars for road improvements.

You can read the complete report below.

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