Tax cut bill in Iowa draws mixed reactions - WGEM.com: Quincy News, Weather, Sports, and Radio

Tax cut bill in Iowa draws mixed reactions

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Small Businesses say it will be a big relief. Small Businesses say it will be a big relief.
Kearns said it could cause problems in the future. Kearns said it could cause problems in the future.
Governor said it was meant to help the middle class, small businesses, and farmers. Governor said it was meant to help the middle class, small businesses, and farmers.
Residents had mixed reaction on the bill. Residents had mixed reaction on the bill.
The bill hopes to put more money in people's pockets. The bill hopes to put more money in people's pockets.
KEOKUK, Ia. (WGEM) -

A bill approved by Iowa lawmakers promises to cut taxes by more than $2 billion over the next six years. 

Democrats said this will have an impact on public services while Republicans say the legislation promotes economic growth. 

Java River in Keokuk brews coffee for dozens of people every day and owner Dan Winn said while business is great, taxes pile up in a hurry. 

"You think you're doing very good and then your quarterly taxes come up and you go, 'Oh wow!' So yeah, these tax breaks are very needed for small businesses," Winn said.  

But, Democratic State Representative Jerry Kearns said it does more harm than good. 

"I think it was a mistake to a great extent, there is no question everyone likes a tax cut, I like one too, but it's going to starve the basic programs," Kearns said. 

Kearns feels this bill helps the wealthy and big coorporations and hurts his constituents in Lee County. 

"75-80 percent of it went to the top level income earners in the state, the rest of it went to everyone else," Kearns said.  

The bill hopes to put more money into people's pockets.

Small business owners said that's a good thing because it will grow the economy. 

"It's really important," Winn said. "Whenever they can get a tax break, that's more money in their pocket for groceries or their prescription or whatever."

Still, some people worry that it will affect services, like schools and safety. 

"We've got to have education, we have to train people to do jobs, and cutting funds for it is not doing that," Jackson Township resident Allan Nelson said. 

Kearns said this all stemmed from the federal tax cuts that President Trump made last year. 

"Republicans said we shouldn't keep that money in the budget, we should give it back to the tax payers but frankly, this would've helped balance our budget."

Kearns said the cuts won't be felt by residents until next July.

He said bills on school vouchers and filling state judge vacancies have all been pushed back because of the tax cut bill.

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