Hannibal BPW moves forward with new filtration system - WGEM.com: Quincy News, Weather, Sports, and Radio

Hannibal BPW moves forward with new filtration system

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Hannibal water treatment facility Hannibal water treatment facility
Hannibal water treatment facility Hannibal water treatment facility
Hannibal water treatment facility Hannibal water treatment facility
Hannibal water treatment facility Hannibal water treatment facility
Hannibal water treatment facility Hannibal water treatment facility

Now that the Hannibal Board of Public Works has secured funding, it's ready to move forward with a new filtration system to treat the city's drinking water.

Tuesday, voters overwhelmingly approved a $17 million bond to fund the project.

"We requested a little more than we thought we needed. That way when we get our bids this winter, we will have enough funds available," said BPW general manager Heath Hall.

As Jeanne Fortner fills a glass of water in her Hannibal home, she said neither she or her boyfriend will drink it.

"I don't like the taste and I don't like the thought of having chemicals in it like ammonia." said Fortner.

The new granular activated carbon filtration system will be in a building located next to the current water plant and it will replace the ammonia feed system.

"We're going to see a second filtration system here at the water plant. You're going to get cleaner water obviously because it is filtered twice. We're going to remove more of the organics, more of the dirt that comes from the river." said Hall.

And cleaner water is something Fortner said she looks forward to.

"It'll save us tons of money not having to buy all that bottled water or go to Wal-Mart and fill up our big water jug because that's a big inconvenience in itself," said Fortner.

Right now the design of the new building and system is only about sixty percent complete. BPW officials said that will be finished by the end of September and they hope the entire project is done by February 2020.

In April 2017, voters approved changing the city's water filtration to a granular activated carbon system.

In March, survey results showed customers were willing to pay more to remove ammonia and chloramines from the water supply.

In May, BPW said they would need funding assistance for the new system in the form of a bond and Tuesday, voters approved a $17 million bond for the project.

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